Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The Role of Incretins

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Standard

Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation : The Role of Incretins. / Vadmand, Amalia Christina; Nissen, Anne Anker; Mathiesen, Sidsel; Ebbesen, Maria Schou; Gerbek, Tina; Fridh, Martin Kaj; Sørensen, Kaspar; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul; Müller, Klaus.

I: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Bind 108, Nr. 2, 2023, s. 453–462.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Vadmand, AC, Nissen, AA, Mathiesen, S, Ebbesen, MS, Gerbek, T, Fridh, MK, Sørensen, K, Hartmann, B, Holst, JJ & Müller, K 2023, 'Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The Role of Incretins', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, bind 108, nr. 2, s. 453–462. https://doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgac561

APA

Vadmand, A. C., Nissen, A. A., Mathiesen, S., Ebbesen, M. S., Gerbek, T., Fridh, M. K., Sørensen, K., Hartmann, B., Holst, J. J., & Müller, K. (2023). Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The Role of Incretins. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 108(2), 453–462. https://doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgac561

Vancouver

Vadmand AC, Nissen AA, Mathiesen S, Ebbesen MS, Gerbek T, Fridh MK o.a. Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The Role of Incretins. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2023;108(2):453–462. https://doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgac561

Author

Vadmand, Amalia Christina ; Nissen, Anne Anker ; Mathiesen, Sidsel ; Ebbesen, Maria Schou ; Gerbek, Tina ; Fridh, Martin Kaj ; Sørensen, Kaspar ; Hartmann, Bolette ; Holst, Jens Juul ; Müller, Klaus. / Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation : The Role of Incretins. I: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2023 ; Bind 108, Nr. 2. s. 453–462.

Bibtex

@article{8b9492e4d0ca49e08f4f816554e01396,
title = "Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: The Role of Incretins",
abstract = "CONTEXT: Survivors of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the mechanisms are poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that insufficient secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) plays a pathogenetic role in HSCT survivors with MetS.DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study.SETTING: The Danish national referral center for HSCT.PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Forty-two male HSCT survivors (median age of 28.9 years) studied median 21.2 years from HSCT. Fifteen age- and sex-matched healthy controls.INTERVENTION: None.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glucose metabolism and incretin hormones (measured in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)) and MetS-criteria. The hypothesis was formulated before data collection.RESULTS: GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon during an OGTT were similar in patients and controls, with no overall difference between survivors with (24%) and without MetS. However, fasting glucagon was significantly higher in patients with hypertriglyceridemia (Mean Difference (MD): 6.1 pmol/L, 95%Confidence Interval (CI): 1.5 to 10.8, p = 0.01), and correlated with HDL (MD: 4.7 mmol/L, 95%CI: -0.6 to 9.9, p = 0.08), android-gynoid ratio (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.6, p = 0.0001) and waist-hip ratio (r = 0.5, p = 0.002). A similar pattern was seen for GIP, correlating positively with triglyceride (MD: 60%, 95%CI: 44 to 82, p = 0.002).GIP levels were significantly increased in patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI) (MD: 165%, 95%CI: 118 to 230, p = 0.004), that was found to be a significant risk factor for MetS.CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates an altered production of incretin hormones in HSCT survivors previously treated with TBI, developing dyslipidemia and abdominal adiposity.",
author = "Vadmand, {Amalia Christina} and Nissen, {Anne Anker} and Sidsel Mathiesen and Ebbesen, {Maria Schou} and Tina Gerbek and Fridh, {Martin Kaj} and Kaspar S{\o}rensen and Bolette Hartmann and Holst, {Jens Juul} and Klaus M{\"u}ller",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2023",
doi = "10.1210/clinem/dgac561",
language = "English",
volume = "108",
pages = "453–462",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic Dysregulation in Adult Survivors of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

T2 - The Role of Incretins

AU - Vadmand, Amalia Christina

AU - Nissen, Anne Anker

AU - Mathiesen, Sidsel

AU - Ebbesen, Maria Schou

AU - Gerbek, Tina

AU - Fridh, Martin Kaj

AU - Sørensen, Kaspar

AU - Hartmann, Bolette

AU - Holst, Jens Juul

AU - Müller, Klaus

N1 - © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Endocrine Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2023

Y1 - 2023

N2 - CONTEXT: Survivors of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the mechanisms are poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that insufficient secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) plays a pathogenetic role in HSCT survivors with MetS.DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study.SETTING: The Danish national referral center for HSCT.PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Forty-two male HSCT survivors (median age of 28.9 years) studied median 21.2 years from HSCT. Fifteen age- and sex-matched healthy controls.INTERVENTION: None.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glucose metabolism and incretin hormones (measured in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)) and MetS-criteria. The hypothesis was formulated before data collection.RESULTS: GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon during an OGTT were similar in patients and controls, with no overall difference between survivors with (24%) and without MetS. However, fasting glucagon was significantly higher in patients with hypertriglyceridemia (Mean Difference (MD): 6.1 pmol/L, 95%Confidence Interval (CI): 1.5 to 10.8, p = 0.01), and correlated with HDL (MD: 4.7 mmol/L, 95%CI: -0.6 to 9.9, p = 0.08), android-gynoid ratio (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.6, p = 0.0001) and waist-hip ratio (r = 0.5, p = 0.002). A similar pattern was seen for GIP, correlating positively with triglyceride (MD: 60%, 95%CI: 44 to 82, p = 0.002).GIP levels were significantly increased in patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI) (MD: 165%, 95%CI: 118 to 230, p = 0.004), that was found to be a significant risk factor for MetS.CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates an altered production of incretin hormones in HSCT survivors previously treated with TBI, developing dyslipidemia and abdominal adiposity.

AB - CONTEXT: Survivors of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the mechanisms are poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that insufficient secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) plays a pathogenetic role in HSCT survivors with MetS.DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study.SETTING: The Danish national referral center for HSCT.PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Forty-two male HSCT survivors (median age of 28.9 years) studied median 21.2 years from HSCT. Fifteen age- and sex-matched healthy controls.INTERVENTION: None.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glucose metabolism and incretin hormones (measured in an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)) and MetS-criteria. The hypothesis was formulated before data collection.RESULTS: GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon during an OGTT were similar in patients and controls, with no overall difference between survivors with (24%) and without MetS. However, fasting glucagon was significantly higher in patients with hypertriglyceridemia (Mean Difference (MD): 6.1 pmol/L, 95%Confidence Interval (CI): 1.5 to 10.8, p = 0.01), and correlated with HDL (MD: 4.7 mmol/L, 95%CI: -0.6 to 9.9, p = 0.08), android-gynoid ratio (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.6, p = 0.0001) and waist-hip ratio (r = 0.5, p = 0.002). A similar pattern was seen for GIP, correlating positively with triglyceride (MD: 60%, 95%CI: 44 to 82, p = 0.002).GIP levels were significantly increased in patients treated with total body irradiation (TBI) (MD: 165%, 95%CI: 118 to 230, p = 0.004), that was found to be a significant risk factor for MetS.CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates an altered production of incretin hormones in HSCT survivors previously treated with TBI, developing dyslipidemia and abdominal adiposity.

U2 - 10.1210/clinem/dgac561

DO - 10.1210/clinem/dgac561

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 36181459

VL - 108

SP - 453

EP - 462

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 321555153