How does cultural capital affect educational performance: Signals or skills?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

How does cultural capital affect educational performance : Signals or skills? / Breinholt, Asta; Jæger, Mads Meier.

I: British Journal of Sociology, Bind 71, 2020, s. 28–46.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Breinholt, A & Jæger, MM 2020, 'How does cultural capital affect educational performance: Signals or skills?', British Journal of Sociology, bind 71, s. 28–46. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12711

APA

Breinholt, A., & Jæger, M. M. (2020). How does cultural capital affect educational performance: Signals or skills? British Journal of Sociology, 71, 28–46. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12711

Vancouver

Breinholt A, Jæger MM. How does cultural capital affect educational performance: Signals or skills? British Journal of Sociology. 2020;71:28–46. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12711

Author

Breinholt, Asta ; Jæger, Mads Meier. / How does cultural capital affect educational performance : Signals or skills?. I: British Journal of Sociology. 2020 ; Bind 71. s. 28–46.

Bibtex

@article{3439638b2639455eafaa42576e5f479a,
title = "How does cultural capital affect educational performance: Signals or skills?",
abstract = "In this paper, we test two mechanisms through which cultural capital might affect educational performance: (a) teachers misinterpreting cultural capital as signals of academic brilliance and (b) cultural capital fostering skills in children that enhance educational performance. We analyse data from the ECLS‐K and ECLS‐K:2011 from the United States and focus on three aspects of children’s cultural capital: participation in performing arts, reading interest and participation in athletics and clubs. We find that (1) none of the three aspects of cultural capital that we consider affects teachers’ evaluations of children’s academic skills; (2) reading interest has a direct positive effect on educational performance; and (3) the direct effect of reading interest on educational performance does not depend on schooling context. Our results provide little support for the hypothesis that cultural capital operates via signals about academic brilliance. Instead, they suggest that cultural capital fosters skills in children that enhance educational performance. We discuss the theoretical implications of our findings.",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, cultural capital, educational success, teacher bias, schooling context, non-cognitive skills",
author = "Asta Breinholt and J{\ae}ger, {Mads Meier}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1111/1468-4446.12711",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "28–46",
journal = "British Journal of Sociology",
issn = "0007-1315",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How does cultural capital affect educational performance

T2 - Signals or skills?

AU - Breinholt, Asta

AU - Jæger, Mads Meier

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - In this paper, we test two mechanisms through which cultural capital might affect educational performance: (a) teachers misinterpreting cultural capital as signals of academic brilliance and (b) cultural capital fostering skills in children that enhance educational performance. We analyse data from the ECLS‐K and ECLS‐K:2011 from the United States and focus on three aspects of children’s cultural capital: participation in performing arts, reading interest and participation in athletics and clubs. We find that (1) none of the three aspects of cultural capital that we consider affects teachers’ evaluations of children’s academic skills; (2) reading interest has a direct positive effect on educational performance; and (3) the direct effect of reading interest on educational performance does not depend on schooling context. Our results provide little support for the hypothesis that cultural capital operates via signals about academic brilliance. Instead, they suggest that cultural capital fosters skills in children that enhance educational performance. We discuss the theoretical implications of our findings.

AB - In this paper, we test two mechanisms through which cultural capital might affect educational performance: (a) teachers misinterpreting cultural capital as signals of academic brilliance and (b) cultural capital fostering skills in children that enhance educational performance. We analyse data from the ECLS‐K and ECLS‐K:2011 from the United States and focus on three aspects of children’s cultural capital: participation in performing arts, reading interest and participation in athletics and clubs. We find that (1) none of the three aspects of cultural capital that we consider affects teachers’ evaluations of children’s academic skills; (2) reading interest has a direct positive effect on educational performance; and (3) the direct effect of reading interest on educational performance does not depend on schooling context. Our results provide little support for the hypothesis that cultural capital operates via signals about academic brilliance. Instead, they suggest that cultural capital fosters skills in children that enhance educational performance. We discuss the theoretical implications of our findings.

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - cultural capital

KW - educational success

KW - teacher bias

KW - schooling context

KW - non-cognitive skills

U2 - 10.1111/1468-4446.12711

DO - 10.1111/1468-4446.12711

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31903604

VL - 71

SP - 28

EP - 46

JO - British Journal of Sociology

JF - British Journal of Sociology

SN - 0007-1315

ER -

ID: 212122556