Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure. / Lawley, Justin S.; Petersen, Lonnie G.; Howden, Erin J.; Sarma, Satyam; Cornwell, William K.; Zhang, Rong; Whitworth, Louis A.; Williams, Michael A.; Levine, Benjamin D.

I: Journal of Physiology, Bind 595, Nr. 6, 2017, s. 2115-2127.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Lawley, JS, Petersen, LG, Howden, EJ, Sarma, S, Cornwell, WK, Zhang, R, Whitworth, LA, Williams, MA & Levine, BD 2017, 'Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure', Journal of Physiology, bind 595, nr. 6, s. 2115-2127. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP273557

APA

Lawley, J. S., Petersen, L. G., Howden, E. J., Sarma, S., Cornwell, W. K., Zhang, R., ... Levine, B. D. (2017). Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure. Journal of Physiology, 595(6), 2115-2127. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP273557

Vancouver

Lawley JS, Petersen LG, Howden EJ, Sarma S, Cornwell WK, Zhang R o.a. Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure. Journal of Physiology. 2017;595(6):2115-2127. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP273557

Author

Lawley, Justin S. ; Petersen, Lonnie G. ; Howden, Erin J. ; Sarma, Satyam ; Cornwell, William K. ; Zhang, Rong ; Whitworth, Louis A. ; Williams, Michael A. ; Levine, Benjamin D. / Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure. I: Journal of Physiology. 2017 ; Bind 595, Nr. 6. s. 2115-2127.

Bibtex

@article{6759d58917d0404185d66dac7b2d0def,
title = "Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure",
abstract = "Key Points: Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure on Earth. Gravity has a profound effect on fluid distribution and pressure within the human circulation. In contrast to prevailing theory, we observed that microgravity reduces central venous and intracranial pressure. This being said, intracranial pressure is not reduced to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Thus, over 24 h in zero gravity, pressure in the brain is slightly above that observed on Earth, which may explain remodelling of the eye in astronauts. Abstract: Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This syndrome is considered the most mission-critical medical problem identified in the past decade of manned spaceflight. We recruited five men and three women who had an Ommaya reservoir inserted for the delivery of prophylactic CNS chemotherapy, but were free of their malignant disease for at least 1 year. ICP was assessed by placing a fluid-filled 25 gauge butterfly needle into the Ommaya reservoir. Subjects were studied in the upright and supine position, during acute zero gravity (parabolic flight) and prolonged simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt bedrest). ICP was lower when seated in the 90 deg upright posture compared to lying supine (seated, 4 ± 1 vs. supine, 15 ± 2 mmHg). Whilst lying in the supine posture, central venous pressure (supine, 7 ± 3 vs. microgravity, 4 ± 2 mmHg) and ICP (supine, 17 ± 2 vs. microgravity, 13 ± 2 mmHg) were reduced in acute zero gravity, although not to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Prolonged periods of simulated microgravity did not cause progressive elevations in ICP (supine, 15 ± 2 vs. 24 h head-down tilt, 15 ± 4 mmHg). Complete removal of gravity does not pathologically elevate ICP but does prevent the normal lowering of ICP when upright. These findings suggest the human brain is protected by the daily circadian cycles in regional ICPs, without which pathology may occur.",
keywords = "bedrest, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, ocular remodeling, posture, space",
author = "Lawley, {Justin S.} and Petersen, {Lonnie G.} and Howden, {Erin J.} and Satyam Sarma and Cornwell, {William K.} and Rong Zhang and Whitworth, {Louis A.} and Williams, {Michael A.} and Levine, {Benjamin D.}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1113/JP273557",
language = "English",
volume = "595",
pages = "2115--2127",
journal = "The Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0022-3751",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure

AU - Lawley, Justin S.

AU - Petersen, Lonnie G.

AU - Howden, Erin J.

AU - Sarma, Satyam

AU - Cornwell, William K.

AU - Zhang, Rong

AU - Whitworth, Louis A.

AU - Williams, Michael A.

AU - Levine, Benjamin D.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Key Points: Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure on Earth. Gravity has a profound effect on fluid distribution and pressure within the human circulation. In contrast to prevailing theory, we observed that microgravity reduces central venous and intracranial pressure. This being said, intracranial pressure is not reduced to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Thus, over 24 h in zero gravity, pressure in the brain is slightly above that observed on Earth, which may explain remodelling of the eye in astronauts. Abstract: Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This syndrome is considered the most mission-critical medical problem identified in the past decade of manned spaceflight. We recruited five men and three women who had an Ommaya reservoir inserted for the delivery of prophylactic CNS chemotherapy, but were free of their malignant disease for at least 1 year. ICP was assessed by placing a fluid-filled 25 gauge butterfly needle into the Ommaya reservoir. Subjects were studied in the upright and supine position, during acute zero gravity (parabolic flight) and prolonged simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt bedrest). ICP was lower when seated in the 90 deg upright posture compared to lying supine (seated, 4 ± 1 vs. supine, 15 ± 2 mmHg). Whilst lying in the supine posture, central venous pressure (supine, 7 ± 3 vs. microgravity, 4 ± 2 mmHg) and ICP (supine, 17 ± 2 vs. microgravity, 13 ± 2 mmHg) were reduced in acute zero gravity, although not to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Prolonged periods of simulated microgravity did not cause progressive elevations in ICP (supine, 15 ± 2 vs. 24 h head-down tilt, 15 ± 4 mmHg). Complete removal of gravity does not pathologically elevate ICP but does prevent the normal lowering of ICP when upright. These findings suggest the human brain is protected by the daily circadian cycles in regional ICPs, without which pathology may occur.

AB - Key Points: Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure on Earth. Gravity has a profound effect on fluid distribution and pressure within the human circulation. In contrast to prevailing theory, we observed that microgravity reduces central venous and intracranial pressure. This being said, intracranial pressure is not reduced to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Thus, over 24 h in zero gravity, pressure in the brain is slightly above that observed on Earth, which may explain remodelling of the eye in astronauts. Abstract: Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This syndrome is considered the most mission-critical medical problem identified in the past decade of manned spaceflight. We recruited five men and three women who had an Ommaya reservoir inserted for the delivery of prophylactic CNS chemotherapy, but were free of their malignant disease for at least 1 year. ICP was assessed by placing a fluid-filled 25 gauge butterfly needle into the Ommaya reservoir. Subjects were studied in the upright and supine position, during acute zero gravity (parabolic flight) and prolonged simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt bedrest). ICP was lower when seated in the 90 deg upright posture compared to lying supine (seated, 4 ± 1 vs. supine, 15 ± 2 mmHg). Whilst lying in the supine posture, central venous pressure (supine, 7 ± 3 vs. microgravity, 4 ± 2 mmHg) and ICP (supine, 17 ± 2 vs. microgravity, 13 ± 2 mmHg) were reduced in acute zero gravity, although not to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Prolonged periods of simulated microgravity did not cause progressive elevations in ICP (supine, 15 ± 2 vs. 24 h head-down tilt, 15 ± 4 mmHg). Complete removal of gravity does not pathologically elevate ICP but does prevent the normal lowering of ICP when upright. These findings suggest the human brain is protected by the daily circadian cycles in regional ICPs, without which pathology may occur.

KW - bedrest

KW - idiopathic intracranial hypertension

KW - ocular remodeling

KW - posture

KW - space

U2 - 10.1113/JP273557

DO - 10.1113/JP273557

M3 - Journal article

VL - 595

SP - 2115

EP - 2127

JO - The Journal of Physiology

JF - The Journal of Physiology

SN - 0022-3751

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 196915039