Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass

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Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass. / Abildgaard, Julie; Ploug, Thorkil; Al-Saoudi, Elaf; Wagner, Thomas; Thomsen, Carsten; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bzorek, Michael; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Lindegaard, Birgitte.

I: Scientific Reports, Bind 11, Nr. 1, 14750, 12.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Abildgaard, J, Ploug, T, Al-Saoudi, E, Wagner, T, Thomsen, C, Ewertsen, C, Bzorek, M, Pedersen, BK, Pedersen, AT & Lindegaard, B 2021, 'Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass', Scientific Reports, bind 11, nr. 1, 14750. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94189-2

APA

Abildgaard, J., Ploug, T., Al-Saoudi, E., Wagner, T., Thomsen, C., Ewertsen, C., Bzorek, M., Pedersen, B. K., Pedersen, A. T., & Lindegaard, B. (2021). Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass. Scientific Reports, 11(1), [14750]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94189-2

Vancouver

Abildgaard J, Ploug T, Al-Saoudi E, Wagner T, Thomsen C, Ewertsen C o.a. Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass. Scientific Reports. 2021 dec;11(1). 14750. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94189-2

Author

Abildgaard, Julie ; Ploug, Thorkil ; Al-Saoudi, Elaf ; Wagner, Thomas ; Thomsen, Carsten ; Ewertsen, Caroline ; Bzorek, Michael ; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund ; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes ; Lindegaard, Birgitte. / Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass. I: Scientific Reports. 2021 ; Bind 11, Nr. 1.

Bibtex

@article{ae580e9a928f4d6dbf3c3ccbe76a78a6,
title = "Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass",
abstract = "Menopause is associated with a redistribution of adipose tissue towards central adiposity, known to cause insulin resistance. In this cross-sectional study of 33 women between 45 and 60 years, we assessed adipose tissue inflammation and morphology in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) across menopause and related this to menopausal differences in adipose tissue distribution and insulin resistance. We collected paired SAT and VAT biopsies from all women and combined this with anthropometric measurements and estimated whole-body insulin sensitivity. We found that menopause was associated with changes in adipose tissue phenotype related to metabolic dysfunction. In SAT, postmenopausal women showed adipocyte hypertrophy, increased inflammation, hypoxia and fibrosis. The postmenopausal changes in SAT was associated with increased visceral fat accumulation. In VAT, menopause was associated with adipocyte hypertrophy, immune cell infiltration and fibrosis. The postmenopausal changes in VAT phenotype was associated with decreased insulin sensitivity. Based on these findings we suggest, that menopause is associated with changes in adipose tissue phenotype related to metabolic dysfunction in both SAT and VAT. Whereas increased SAT inflammation in the context of menopause is associated with VAT accumulation, VAT morphology is related to insulin resistance.",
author = "Julie Abildgaard and Thorkil Ploug and Elaf Al-Saoudi and Thomas Wagner and Carsten Thomsen and Caroline Ewertsen and Michael Bzorek and Pedersen, {Bente Klarlund} and Pedersen, {Anette T{\o}nnes} and Birgitte Lindegaard",
note = "Funding Information: The Centre for Physical Activity Research (CFAS) is supported by TrygFonden (Grants ID 101390 and ID 20045). During the study period, the Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism (CIM) was supported by a grant from the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF55). Funding Information: Funding was provided by Augustinus Fonden (Grant no. 17-2354). Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021, The Author(s).",
year = "2021",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1038/s41598-021-94189-2",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "nature publishing group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue phenotype following menopause is associated with increased visceral fat mass

AU - Abildgaard, Julie

AU - Ploug, Thorkil

AU - Al-Saoudi, Elaf

AU - Wagner, Thomas

AU - Thomsen, Carsten

AU - Ewertsen, Caroline

AU - Bzorek, Michael

AU - Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

AU - Pedersen, Anette Tønnes

AU - Lindegaard, Birgitte

N1 - Funding Information: The Centre for Physical Activity Research (CFAS) is supported by TrygFonden (Grants ID 101390 and ID 20045). During the study period, the Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism (CIM) was supported by a grant from the Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF55). Funding Information: Funding was provided by Augustinus Fonden (Grant no. 17-2354). Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s).

PY - 2021/12

Y1 - 2021/12

N2 - Menopause is associated with a redistribution of adipose tissue towards central adiposity, known to cause insulin resistance. In this cross-sectional study of 33 women between 45 and 60 years, we assessed adipose tissue inflammation and morphology in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) across menopause and related this to menopausal differences in adipose tissue distribution and insulin resistance. We collected paired SAT and VAT biopsies from all women and combined this with anthropometric measurements and estimated whole-body insulin sensitivity. We found that menopause was associated with changes in adipose tissue phenotype related to metabolic dysfunction. In SAT, postmenopausal women showed adipocyte hypertrophy, increased inflammation, hypoxia and fibrosis. The postmenopausal changes in SAT was associated with increased visceral fat accumulation. In VAT, menopause was associated with adipocyte hypertrophy, immune cell infiltration and fibrosis. The postmenopausal changes in VAT phenotype was associated with decreased insulin sensitivity. Based on these findings we suggest, that menopause is associated with changes in adipose tissue phenotype related to metabolic dysfunction in both SAT and VAT. Whereas increased SAT inflammation in the context of menopause is associated with VAT accumulation, VAT morphology is related to insulin resistance.

AB - Menopause is associated with a redistribution of adipose tissue towards central adiposity, known to cause insulin resistance. In this cross-sectional study of 33 women between 45 and 60 years, we assessed adipose tissue inflammation and morphology in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) across menopause and related this to menopausal differences in adipose tissue distribution and insulin resistance. We collected paired SAT and VAT biopsies from all women and combined this with anthropometric measurements and estimated whole-body insulin sensitivity. We found that menopause was associated with changes in adipose tissue phenotype related to metabolic dysfunction. In SAT, postmenopausal women showed adipocyte hypertrophy, increased inflammation, hypoxia and fibrosis. The postmenopausal changes in SAT was associated with increased visceral fat accumulation. In VAT, menopause was associated with adipocyte hypertrophy, immune cell infiltration and fibrosis. The postmenopausal changes in VAT phenotype was associated with decreased insulin sensitivity. Based on these findings we suggest, that menopause is associated with changes in adipose tissue phenotype related to metabolic dysfunction in both SAT and VAT. Whereas increased SAT inflammation in the context of menopause is associated with VAT accumulation, VAT morphology is related to insulin resistance.

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-021-94189-2

DO - 10.1038/s41598-021-94189-2

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34285301

AN - SCOPUS:85111121446

VL - 11

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 14750

ER -

ID: 278484765