Dissemination of research focus and results

March 17, 2011, Roskilde:
Flemming Dela has taken part in a performance of the "Science Theatre" about diabetes and obesity, by giving a lecture and subsequently answering questions. Number of participants: 120.

January, 2011.
Michael Taulo Lund presents the project at Keystone Symposia in Obesity & Type 2 Diabetes. Keystone, USA. Title "Changes in Fat Oxidation after voluntary weight loss in Morbidly Obese patients with or without type 2 diabetes."

Abstract: Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is accompanied by intramyocellular lipid accumulation. This may in part be explained by an impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation and increased availability of plasma FFA. Our aim was to examine and compare fat oxidation changes after an uncontrolled voluntary weight loss in morbidly obese patients with or without T2DM. Patients included were losing weight prior to scheduled gastric bypass operation.

17 patients (3M/12F; 6 with and 11 without T2DM; Age 41±10 vs. 41±8 yrs; BMI 41±3 vs. 43±5 Kg*(m2)-1; Lean body mass (LBM) 59±3 vs. 62±3 kg). Fat oxidation was measured by indirect calorimetry during a graded exercise test on a stationary bike (15W warm-up 4 min., increase 25W/3 min.). Fasting blood samples and muscle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis were acquired on a separate day. Tests were performed at baseline and after 1.5 mo. Weight loss was similar in patients with or without T2DM (5±1 vs. 7±1Kg). VO2Max (2.4±0.2 and 2.7±0.2 L O2*min-1) and maximal fat oxidation rate (326±45 and 342±45 mg*min-1) were similar in the two groups, and did not change with weight loss (data not shown). However, maximal fat oxidation rate occurred at a lower relative workload after weight loss in patients with T2DM (41.1±2.0 vs. 38.6±2.1 %VO2max, p=0.033). The same tendency was found in patients without T2DM (40.4±2.1 vs. 37.9±1.5 %VO2max p=0.057).

The reason that the T2DM patients has maximal fat oxidation at a lower relative workload after their weight loss is most likely a lower availability of fatty acids in plasma and muscle during exercise consistent with the observed weight loss. Further analysis will attempt to elucidate a mechanism explaining the observed difference between the groups.

October, 2010
Michael Taulo Lund presents the project at the Course in Exercise & Clinical Physiology. Concordia University Montreal, Canada. Title "Changes in Fat Oxidation after voluntary weight loss in Morbidly Obese patients with or without type 2 diabetes."

Abstract: Obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is accompanied by intramyocellular lipid accumulation. This may in part be explained by an impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation and increased availability of plasma FFA. Our aim was to examine and compare fat oxidation changes after an uncontrolled voluntary weight loss in morbidly obese patients with or without T2DM. Patients included were losing weight prior to scheduled gastric bypass operation.

10 patients (3M/7F; 5 with and 5 without T2DM; Age 48±4 vs. 44±2 yrs; BMI 43±1 vs. 43±3 Kg*(m2)-1; Lean body mass (LBM) 62±7 vs. 60±4 kg) were recruited. Fat oxidation was measured by indirect calorimetry during a graded exercise test on a stationary bike (15W warm-up 4 min., increase 25W/3 min.). Hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp technique (80 mU/min/m2) and DEXA scan were performed on a separate day (data not shown). Fasting blood samples, muscle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and fat biopsies from abdominal subcutaneous fat were acquired on the day of the clamp. Tests were performed at baseline and after 1.5 mo.

Weight loss was similar in patients with or without T2DM (5±1 vs. 7±1Kg). VO2Max (2.3±0.08 and 2.9±0.5 L O2*min-1) and maximal fat oxidation rate (292±34 and 388±94 mg*min-1) were similar in the two groups, and did not change with weight loss (data not shown). However, maximal fat oxidation rate occurred at a lower relative workload after weight loss in patients with T2DM (44.6±1.4 vs. 38.4±1.9 %VO2max, p=0.006) whereas there were no difference in patients without T2DM (42.4±3.7 vs. 38±1.8 %VO2max).

The reason that the T2DM patients has maximal fat oxidation at a lower relative workload after their weight loss is most likely a lower availability of fatty acids in plasma and muscle during exercise consistent with the observed weight loss. This study is a part of a larger ongoing study where in all 30 patients will be included. Further analysis will attempt to elucidate a mechanism explaining the observed difference between the groups.

Read about the research methodology and the aim of the research