Group members – University of Copenhagen

English > Research > Renal Hemodynamics > Group members

Group members

Charlotte Mehlin Sørensen has a bachelor in Biology and a Master in Human Biology from University of Copenhagen. She started in the lab of Associate Professor Paul Peter Leyssac as a Master student working on renal autoregulation and the renin-angiotensin system. She proceeded to finish her PhD in the lab of Professor Niels-Henrik Holstein-Rathlou investigating changes in renal autoregulation during hypertension.

After obtaining the PhD degree she was employed at Department of Pharmacology as Assistant Professor and subsequently as Assistant Professor at Department of Biomedical Sciences. During one year leave of absence she worked as a drug discovery project leader at Zealand Pharma but came back to continue as Associate Professor at Department of Biomedical Sciences. Her research is focused on renal hemodynamics and hypertension. Changes in renal autoregulation and regulation as a consequence of changes in intercellular communication and ion channel expression and function is investigated in different disease models.

She is a member of American Physiological Society, Danish Hypertension Society and the Scandinavian Physiological Society. She lectures renal physiology and cardiovascular and renal pharmacology and is responsible for the renal course and examination in renal physiology at 5th semester medical school. She supervises bachelor, master and PhD students.

Sophie Møller has a bachelor of science obtained from Hawaii Pacific University. In 2014 she obtained her Master of Science in Human Biology from University of Copenhagen within the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Today her main area in the group is vascular intercellular communication. She works with murine models and the isolated blood perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation to investigate changes in renal autoregulation during modified connexin expression.

Malte Mose Tetens is a medical student working on his bachelor project on the relation between wall tension and vasomotion in arteries. Malte works with isolated arteries from rats to investigate how changes in wall tension affects the characteristics of vasomotion.

Louise Hauge Nielsen has a bachelor of science obtained from University of Copenhagen. In 2016 she obtained her Master of Science in Human Biology within the field of vascular physiology. Her main area in the group is vascular responses and the influence of pannexins in sympathetic signalling. She works with isolated arteries from rats and mice to investigate modulation of sympathetic vasoconstrition.