Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia: more than protein carbamylation?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia : more than protein carbamylation? / Hawkins, Clare L.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 86, No. 5, 11.2014, p. 875-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Hawkins, CL 2014, 'Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia: more than protein carbamylation?', Kidney International, vol. 86, no. 5, pp. 875-7. https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2014.256

APA

Hawkins, C. L. (2014). Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia: more than protein carbamylation? Kidney International, 86(5), 875-7. https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2014.256

Vancouver

Hawkins CL. Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia: more than protein carbamylation? Kidney International. 2014 Nov;86(5):875-7. https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2014.256

Author

Hawkins, Clare L. / Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia : more than protein carbamylation?. In: Kidney International. 2014 ; Vol. 86, No. 5. pp. 875-7.

Bibtex

@article{c390ea89bac449bd95e136a13b467251,
title = "Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia: more than protein carbamylation?",
abstract = "Cyanate is a uremic toxin responsible for the carbamylation of proteins, which has been implicated as playing a key role in accelerating the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease. El-Gamal et al. report that while cyanate promotes protein carbamylation in vivo, the resulting endothelial dysfunction observed is consistent with reactions mediated by cyanate itself, rather than by carbamylated proteins. This provides new insight into the relationship between uremia and cardiovascular disease.",
keywords = "Animals, Aorta, Cyanates, Endothelial Cells, Endothelium, Vascular, Humans, Male, Vasodilation, Comment, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Hawkins, {Clare L}",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1038/ki.2014.256",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "875--7",
journal = "Kidney International",
issn = "0085-2538",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Role of cyanate in the induction of vascular dysfunction during uremia

T2 - more than protein carbamylation?

AU - Hawkins, Clare L

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Cyanate is a uremic toxin responsible for the carbamylation of proteins, which has been implicated as playing a key role in accelerating the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease. El-Gamal et al. report that while cyanate promotes protein carbamylation in vivo, the resulting endothelial dysfunction observed is consistent with reactions mediated by cyanate itself, rather than by carbamylated proteins. This provides new insight into the relationship between uremia and cardiovascular disease.

AB - Cyanate is a uremic toxin responsible for the carbamylation of proteins, which has been implicated as playing a key role in accelerating the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease. El-Gamal et al. report that while cyanate promotes protein carbamylation in vivo, the resulting endothelial dysfunction observed is consistent with reactions mediated by cyanate itself, rather than by carbamylated proteins. This provides new insight into the relationship between uremia and cardiovascular disease.

KW - Animals

KW - Aorta

KW - Cyanates

KW - Endothelial Cells

KW - Endothelium, Vascular

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Vasodilation

KW - Comment

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1038/ki.2014.256

DO - 10.1038/ki.2014.256

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25360490

VL - 86

SP - 875

EP - 877

JO - Kidney International

JF - Kidney International

SN - 0085-2538

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 174497047