Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans

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Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans. / Veedfald, Simon; Plamboeck, Astrid; Deacon, Carolyn F; Hartmann, Bolette; Knop, Filip K; Lauritsen, Tina Vilsbøll; Holst, Jens J.

In: American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, Vol. 310, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. G43-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Veedfald, S, Plamboeck, A, Deacon, CF, Hartmann, B, Knop, FK, Lauritsen, TV & Holst, JJ 2016, 'Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans', American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, vol. 310, no. 1, pp. G43-51. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpgi.00222.2015

APA

Veedfald, S., Plamboeck, A., Deacon, C. F., Hartmann, B., Knop, F. K., Lauritsen, T. V., & Holst, J. J. (2016). Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans. American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 310(1), G43-51. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpgi.00222.2015

Vancouver

Veedfald S, Plamboeck A, Deacon CF, Hartmann B, Knop FK, Lauritsen TV et al. Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans. American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. 2016 Jan 1;310(1):G43-51. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpgi.00222.2015

Author

Veedfald, Simon ; Plamboeck, Astrid ; Deacon, Carolyn F ; Hartmann, Bolette ; Knop, Filip K ; Lauritsen, Tina Vilsbøll ; Holst, Jens J. / Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans. In: American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. 2016 ; Vol. 310, No. 1. pp. G43-51.

Bibtex

@article{06af459c5bef40eab0decbe228d51cc7,
title = "Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans",
abstract = "Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg/m(2); HbA1c: 5.1 ± 0.1{\%}/31.4 ± 0.5 mmol/mol). Cephalic activation was elicited by modified sham feeding (MSF, aka {"}chew and spit{"}) with or without atropine (1 mg bolus 45 min before MSF + 80 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 2 h). To mimic incipient prandial glucose excursions, glucose levels were clamped at 6 mmol/l on all days. The meal stimulus for the MSF consisted of an appetizing breakfast. Participants (9/10) also had a 6 mmol/l glucose clamp without MSF. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) levels rose from 6.3 ± 1.1 to 19.9 ± 6.8 pmol/l (means ± SE) in response to MSF and atropine lowered basal PP levels and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min on the atropine (ATR) + clamp (CLA) + MSF compared with the saline (SAL) + CLA and SAL + CLA + MSF days; baseline-subtracted glucagon levels were -10.7 ± 1.1 vs. -4.0 ± 1.1 and -4.7 ± 1.9 pmol/l (means ± SE), P < 0.0001, respectively; corresponding baseline-subtracted ghrelin levels were 303 ± 36 vs. 39 ± 38 and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P < 0.0001. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were unaffected by MSF. Despite adequate PP responses, a cephalic phase response was absent for insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin.",
author = "Simon Veedfald and Astrid Plamboeck and Deacon, {Carolyn F} and Bolette Hartmann and Knop, {Filip K} and Lauritsen, {Tina Vilsb{\o}ll} and Holst, {Jens J}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2016 the American Physiological Society.",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1152/ajpgi.00222.2015",
language = "English",
volume = "310",
pages = "G43--51",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology",
issn = "0193-1857",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cephalic phase secretion of insulin and other enteropancreatic hormones in humans

AU - Veedfald, Simon

AU - Plamboeck, Astrid

AU - Deacon, Carolyn F

AU - Hartmann, Bolette

AU - Knop, Filip K

AU - Lauritsen, Tina Vilsbøll

AU - Holst, Jens J

N1 - Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg/m(2); HbA1c: 5.1 ± 0.1%/31.4 ± 0.5 mmol/mol). Cephalic activation was elicited by modified sham feeding (MSF, aka "chew and spit") with or without atropine (1 mg bolus 45 min before MSF + 80 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 2 h). To mimic incipient prandial glucose excursions, glucose levels were clamped at 6 mmol/l on all days. The meal stimulus for the MSF consisted of an appetizing breakfast. Participants (9/10) also had a 6 mmol/l glucose clamp without MSF. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) levels rose from 6.3 ± 1.1 to 19.9 ± 6.8 pmol/l (means ± SE) in response to MSF and atropine lowered basal PP levels and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min on the atropine (ATR) + clamp (CLA) + MSF compared with the saline (SAL) + CLA and SAL + CLA + MSF days; baseline-subtracted glucagon levels were -10.7 ± 1.1 vs. -4.0 ± 1.1 and -4.7 ± 1.9 pmol/l (means ± SE), P < 0.0001, respectively; corresponding baseline-subtracted ghrelin levels were 303 ± 36 vs. 39 ± 38 and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P < 0.0001. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were unaffected by MSF. Despite adequate PP responses, a cephalic phase response was absent for insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin.

AB - Enteropancreatic hormone secretion is thought to include a cephalic phase, but the evidence in humans is ambiguous. We studied vagally induced gut hormone responses with and without muscarinic blockade in 10 glucose-clamped healthy men (age: 24.5 ± 0.6 yr, means ± SE; body mass index: 24.0 ± 0.5 kg/m(2); HbA1c: 5.1 ± 0.1%/31.4 ± 0.5 mmol/mol). Cephalic activation was elicited by modified sham feeding (MSF, aka "chew and spit") with or without atropine (1 mg bolus 45 min before MSF + 80 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 2 h). To mimic incipient prandial glucose excursions, glucose levels were clamped at 6 mmol/l on all days. The meal stimulus for the MSF consisted of an appetizing breakfast. Participants (9/10) also had a 6 mmol/l glucose clamp without MSF. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) levels rose from 6.3 ± 1.1 to 19.9 ± 6.8 pmol/l (means ± SE) in response to MSF and atropine lowered basal PP levels and abolished the MSF response. Neither insulin, C-peptide, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), nor glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels changed in response to MSF or atropine. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were markedly attenuated by atropine prior to and during the clamp: at t = 105 min on the atropine (ATR) + clamp (CLA) + MSF compared with the saline (SAL) + CLA and SAL + CLA + MSF days; baseline-subtracted glucagon levels were -10.7 ± 1.1 vs. -4.0 ± 1.1 and -4.7 ± 1.9 pmol/l (means ± SE), P < 0.0001, respectively; corresponding baseline-subtracted ghrelin levels were 303 ± 36 vs. 39 ± 38 and 3.7 ± 21 pg/ml (means ± SE), P < 0.0001. Glucagon and ghrelin levels were unaffected by MSF. Despite adequate PP responses, a cephalic phase response was absent for insulin, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, and ghrelin.

U2 - 10.1152/ajpgi.00222.2015

DO - 10.1152/ajpgi.00222.2015

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26492921

VL - 310

SP - G43-51

JO - American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology

SN - 0193-1857

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 160445834