T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow. / Jensen, Lars Jørn; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Salomonsson, Max; Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin.

I: Channels (Austin), Bind 11, Nr. 3, 2017, s. 183-195.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Jensen, LJ, Nielsen, MS, Salomonsson, M & Sørensen, CM 2017, 'T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow', Channels (Austin), bind 11, nr. 3, s. 183-195. https://doi.org/10.1080/19336950.2016.1273997

APA

Jensen, L. J., Nielsen, M. S., Salomonsson, M., & Sørensen, C. M. (2017). T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow. Channels (Austin), 11(3), 183-195. https://doi.org/10.1080/19336950.2016.1273997

Vancouver

Jensen LJ, Nielsen MS, Salomonsson M, Sørensen CM. T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow. Channels (Austin). 2017;11(3):183-195. https://doi.org/10.1080/19336950.2016.1273997

Author

Jensen, Lars Jørn ; Nielsen, Morten Schak ; Salomonsson, Max ; Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin. / T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow. I: Channels (Austin). 2017 ; Bind 11, Nr. 3. s. 183-195.

Bibtex

@article{5d428ac5fd964374837e2bc523989760,
title = "T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow",
abstract = "L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels are considered to be the primary source of calcium influx during the myogenic response. However, many vascular beds also express T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels. Recent studies suggest that these channels may also play a role in autoregulation. At low pressures (40-80 mm Hg) T-type channels affect myogenic responses in cerebral and mesenteric vascular beds. T-type channels also seem to be involved in skeletal muscle autoregulation. This review discusses the expression and role of T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels in the autoregulation of several different vascular beds. Lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors has been a huge challenge in the field. Now the research has been strengthened by genetically modified models such as mice lacking expression of T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV3.1 and CaV3.2). Hopefully, these new tools will help further elucidate the role of voltage gated T-type Ca(2+) channels in autoregulation and vascular function.",
author = "Jensen, {Lars J{\o}rn} and Nielsen, {Morten Schak} and Max Salomonsson and S{\o}rensen, {Charlotte Mehlin}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1080/19336950.2016.1273997",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "183--195",
journal = "Channels (Austin)",
issn = "1933-6950",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - T-type Ca(2+) channels and Autoregulation of Local Blood Flow

AU - Jensen, Lars Jørn

AU - Nielsen, Morten Schak

AU - Salomonsson, Max

AU - Sørensen, Charlotte Mehlin

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels are considered to be the primary source of calcium influx during the myogenic response. However, many vascular beds also express T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels. Recent studies suggest that these channels may also play a role in autoregulation. At low pressures (40-80 mm Hg) T-type channels affect myogenic responses in cerebral and mesenteric vascular beds. T-type channels also seem to be involved in skeletal muscle autoregulation. This review discusses the expression and role of T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels in the autoregulation of several different vascular beds. Lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors has been a huge challenge in the field. Now the research has been strengthened by genetically modified models such as mice lacking expression of T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV3.1 and CaV3.2). Hopefully, these new tools will help further elucidate the role of voltage gated T-type Ca(2+) channels in autoregulation and vascular function.

AB - L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels are considered to be the primary source of calcium influx during the myogenic response. However, many vascular beds also express T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels. Recent studies suggest that these channels may also play a role in autoregulation. At low pressures (40-80 mm Hg) T-type channels affect myogenic responses in cerebral and mesenteric vascular beds. T-type channels also seem to be involved in skeletal muscle autoregulation. This review discusses the expression and role of T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels in the autoregulation of several different vascular beds. Lack of specific pharmacological inhibitors has been a huge challenge in the field. Now the research has been strengthened by genetically modified models such as mice lacking expression of T-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV3.1 and CaV3.2). Hopefully, these new tools will help further elucidate the role of voltage gated T-type Ca(2+) channels in autoregulation and vascular function.

U2 - 10.1080/19336950.2016.1273997

DO - 10.1080/19336950.2016.1273997

M3 - Review

C2 - 28055302

VL - 11

SP - 183

EP - 195

JO - Channels (Austin)

JF - Channels (Austin)

SN - 1933-6950

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 171118355