Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines

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Standard

Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines. / Matsuba, I; Lernmark, A; Madsen, Ole Dragsbæk; Michelsen, Birgitte; Vissing, H; Welinder, B; Tommerup, N; Mikkelsen, M; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis.

I: In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology, Bind 24, Nr. 11, 11.1988, s. 1071-6.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Matsuba, I, Lernmark, A, Madsen, OD, Michelsen, B, Vissing, H, Welinder, B, Tommerup, N, Mikkelsen, M & Nielsen, JH 1988, 'Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines', In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology, bind 24, nr. 11, s. 1071-6.

APA

Matsuba, I., Lernmark, A., Madsen, O. D., Michelsen, B., Vissing, H., Welinder, B., ... Nielsen, J. H. (1988). Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines. In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology, 24(11), 1071-6.

Vancouver

Matsuba I, Lernmark A, Madsen OD, Michelsen B, Vissing H, Welinder B o.a. Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines. In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology. 1988 nov;24(11):1071-6.

Author

Matsuba, I ; Lernmark, A ; Madsen, Ole Dragsbæk ; Michelsen, Birgitte ; Vissing, H ; Welinder, B ; Tommerup, N ; Mikkelsen, M ; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis. / Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines. I: In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology. 1988 ; Bind 24, Nr. 11. s. 1071-6.

Bibtex

@article{2ccd77190c25452681e7b8a2675d0b56,
title = "Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines",
abstract = "Cross-culture contamination of cell lines propagated in continuous culture is a frequent event and particularly difficult to resolve in cells expressing similar phenotypes. We demonstrate that DNA-DNA hybridization to blotted endonuclease-digested cell DNA effectively detects cross-culture contamination to monitor inter-species as well as intra-species cross contamination. An insulin-producing cell-line, Clone-16, originally cloned from a human fetal endocrine pancreatic cell line did not produce human c-peptide as anticipated. DNA from these cells showed no hybridization to the human ALU sequence probe, BLUR, and lacked restriction fragment length polymorphism typical for the human HLA-DQ beta-chain gene. Although a human insulin gene probe showed a weak, nonhuman hybridization pattern, a cDNA probe for the Syrian hamster insulin gene hybridized strongly consistent with a single copy hamster insulin gene. Karyotyping confirmed the absence of human chromosomes in the Clone-16 cells while sizes, centromere indices, and banding patterns were identical to Syrian hamster fibroblasts. We conclude that the insulin-producing Clone-16 cells are of Syrian hamster origin and demonstrate the effective use of gene probes to control the origin of cell cultures.",
keywords = "Adenoma, Islet Cell, Animals, Blotting, Southern, Cell Line, Chromosome Banding, Cricetinae, DNA Probes, HLA-DQ Antigens, Humans, Insulin, Insulinoma, Mesocricetus, Polymorphism, Genetic, Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length, Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid",
author = "I Matsuba and A Lernmark and Madsen, {Ole Dragsb{\ae}k} and Birgitte Michelsen and H Vissing and B Welinder and N Tommerup and M Mikkelsen and Nielsen, {Jens H{\o}iriis}",
year = "1988",
month = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "1071--6",
journal = "In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines

AU - Matsuba, I

AU - Lernmark, A

AU - Madsen, Ole Dragsbæk

AU - Michelsen, Birgitte

AU - Vissing, H

AU - Welinder, B

AU - Tommerup, N

AU - Mikkelsen, M

AU - Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

PY - 1988/11

Y1 - 1988/11

N2 - Cross-culture contamination of cell lines propagated in continuous culture is a frequent event and particularly difficult to resolve in cells expressing similar phenotypes. We demonstrate that DNA-DNA hybridization to blotted endonuclease-digested cell DNA effectively detects cross-culture contamination to monitor inter-species as well as intra-species cross contamination. An insulin-producing cell-line, Clone-16, originally cloned from a human fetal endocrine pancreatic cell line did not produce human c-peptide as anticipated. DNA from these cells showed no hybridization to the human ALU sequence probe, BLUR, and lacked restriction fragment length polymorphism typical for the human HLA-DQ beta-chain gene. Although a human insulin gene probe showed a weak, nonhuman hybridization pattern, a cDNA probe for the Syrian hamster insulin gene hybridized strongly consistent with a single copy hamster insulin gene. Karyotyping confirmed the absence of human chromosomes in the Clone-16 cells while sizes, centromere indices, and banding patterns were identical to Syrian hamster fibroblasts. We conclude that the insulin-producing Clone-16 cells are of Syrian hamster origin and demonstrate the effective use of gene probes to control the origin of cell cultures.

AB - Cross-culture contamination of cell lines propagated in continuous culture is a frequent event and particularly difficult to resolve in cells expressing similar phenotypes. We demonstrate that DNA-DNA hybridization to blotted endonuclease-digested cell DNA effectively detects cross-culture contamination to monitor inter-species as well as intra-species cross contamination. An insulin-producing cell-line, Clone-16, originally cloned from a human fetal endocrine pancreatic cell line did not produce human c-peptide as anticipated. DNA from these cells showed no hybridization to the human ALU sequence probe, BLUR, and lacked restriction fragment length polymorphism typical for the human HLA-DQ beta-chain gene. Although a human insulin gene probe showed a weak, nonhuman hybridization pattern, a cDNA probe for the Syrian hamster insulin gene hybridized strongly consistent with a single copy hamster insulin gene. Karyotyping confirmed the absence of human chromosomes in the Clone-16 cells while sizes, centromere indices, and banding patterns were identical to Syrian hamster fibroblasts. We conclude that the insulin-producing Clone-16 cells are of Syrian hamster origin and demonstrate the effective use of gene probes to control the origin of cell cultures.

KW - Adenoma, Islet Cell

KW - Animals

KW - Blotting, Southern

KW - Cell Line

KW - Chromosome Banding

KW - Cricetinae

KW - DNA Probes

KW - HLA-DQ Antigens

KW - Humans

KW - Insulin

KW - Insulinoma

KW - Mesocricetus

KW - Polymorphism, Genetic

KW - Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length

KW - Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

SP - 1071

EP - 1076

JO - In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology

JF - In vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology

IS - 11

ER -

ID: 47974645