Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana

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Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana. / Grenov, Benedikte; Larnkjær, Anni; Lee, Reginald; Serena, Anja; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Manary, Mark J.

I: Journal of Nutrition, Bind 150, Nr. 6, 2020, s. 1405-1412.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Grenov, B, Larnkjær, A, Lee, R, Serena, A, Mølgaard, C, Michaelsen, KF & Manary, MJ 2020, 'Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana', Journal of Nutrition, bind 150, nr. 6, s. 1405-1412. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa075

APA

Grenov, B., Larnkjær, A., Lee, R., Serena, A., Mølgaard, C., Michaelsen, K. F., & Manary, M. J. (2020). Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana. Journal of Nutrition, 150(6), 1405-1412. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa075

Vancouver

Grenov B, Larnkjær A, Lee R, Serena A, Mølgaard C, Michaelsen KF o.a. Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana. Journal of Nutrition. 2020;150(6):1405-1412. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa075

Author

Grenov, Benedikte ; Larnkjær, Anni ; Lee, Reginald ; Serena, Anja ; Mølgaard, Christian ; Michaelsen, Kim F. ; Manary, Mark J. / Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana. I: Journal of Nutrition. 2020 ; Bind 150, Nr. 6. s. 1405-1412.

Bibtex

@article{40492108eff74e7896c2e1b53514bd65,
title = "Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana",
abstract = "Background: Milk intake stimulates linear growth and improves cognition in children from low-income countries. These effects may be mediated through insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).Objective: The objective was to assess the effect of milk supplement on circulating IGF-1 and to assess IGF-1 as a correlate of growth and cognition in children.Methods: Secondary data on blood spot IGF-1 from a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial in 6-9-y-old children from rural Ghana were analyzed. Intervention groups received porridge with non-energy-balanced supplements: 8.8 g milk protein/d, 100 kcal/d (Milk8); 4.4 g milk and 4.4 g rice protein/d, 100 kcal/d (Milk/rice); 4.4 g milk protein/d, 48 kcal/d (Milk4); or a control (no protein, 10 kcal/d). IGF-1, length, body composition, and Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were measured at 3.5 or 8.5 mo. Linear regressions were used to assess the effect of milk interventions on IGF-1 and IGF-1 as a correlate of growth and cognition.Results: The increase in IGF-1 was 15.3 (95{\%} CI: 3.3, 27.3) ng/mL higher in children receiving Milk8 compared with the control. The IGF-1 increases in the isonitrogenous, isoenergetic Milk/rice or the Milk4 groups were not different from the control (P ≥ 0.49). The increase in IGF-1 was associated with improvements in 4 out of 5 CANTAB domains. The strongest associations included reductions in {"}mean correct latency{"} from Pattern Recognition Memory and {"}pre-extradimensional (pre-ED) shift errors{"} from Intra/Extradimensional Set Shift (P ≤ 0.005). In addition, change in IGF-1 was positively associated with changes in height, weight, and fat-free mass (P ≤ 0.001).Conclusions: Intake of skimmed milk powder corresponding to one, but not half a glass of milk on school days stimulates IGF-1 in 6-9-y-old Ghanian children. IGF-1 seems to mediate the effect of milk intake on growth and cognition. The association between IGF-1 and cognition in relation to milk intake is novel and opens possibilities for dietary interventions to improve cognition.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Milk, Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Growth, Cognition, Children, Low-income country, Africa",
author = "Benedikte Grenov and Anni Larnkj{\ae}r and Reginald Lee and Anja Serena and Christian M{\o}lgaard and Michaelsen, {Kim F.} and Manary, {Mark J}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} The Author(s) 2020",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1093/jn/nxaa075",
language = "English",
volume = "150",
pages = "1405--1412",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 is positively associated with growth and cognition in 6- to 9-year-old schoolchildren from Ghana

AU - Grenov, Benedikte

AU - Larnkjær, Anni

AU - Lee, Reginald

AU - Serena, Anja

AU - Mølgaard, Christian

AU - Michaelsen, Kim F.

AU - Manary, Mark J

N1 - Copyright © The Author(s) 2020

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Background: Milk intake stimulates linear growth and improves cognition in children from low-income countries. These effects may be mediated through insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).Objective: The objective was to assess the effect of milk supplement on circulating IGF-1 and to assess IGF-1 as a correlate of growth and cognition in children.Methods: Secondary data on blood spot IGF-1 from a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial in 6-9-y-old children from rural Ghana were analyzed. Intervention groups received porridge with non-energy-balanced supplements: 8.8 g milk protein/d, 100 kcal/d (Milk8); 4.4 g milk and 4.4 g rice protein/d, 100 kcal/d (Milk/rice); 4.4 g milk protein/d, 48 kcal/d (Milk4); or a control (no protein, 10 kcal/d). IGF-1, length, body composition, and Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were measured at 3.5 or 8.5 mo. Linear regressions were used to assess the effect of milk interventions on IGF-1 and IGF-1 as a correlate of growth and cognition.Results: The increase in IGF-1 was 15.3 (95% CI: 3.3, 27.3) ng/mL higher in children receiving Milk8 compared with the control. The IGF-1 increases in the isonitrogenous, isoenergetic Milk/rice or the Milk4 groups were not different from the control (P ≥ 0.49). The increase in IGF-1 was associated with improvements in 4 out of 5 CANTAB domains. The strongest associations included reductions in "mean correct latency" from Pattern Recognition Memory and "pre-extradimensional (pre-ED) shift errors" from Intra/Extradimensional Set Shift (P ≤ 0.005). In addition, change in IGF-1 was positively associated with changes in height, weight, and fat-free mass (P ≤ 0.001).Conclusions: Intake of skimmed milk powder corresponding to one, but not half a glass of milk on school days stimulates IGF-1 in 6-9-y-old Ghanian children. IGF-1 seems to mediate the effect of milk intake on growth and cognition. The association between IGF-1 and cognition in relation to milk intake is novel and opens possibilities for dietary interventions to improve cognition.

AB - Background: Milk intake stimulates linear growth and improves cognition in children from low-income countries. These effects may be mediated through insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1).Objective: The objective was to assess the effect of milk supplement on circulating IGF-1 and to assess IGF-1 as a correlate of growth and cognition in children.Methods: Secondary data on blood spot IGF-1 from a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial in 6-9-y-old children from rural Ghana were analyzed. Intervention groups received porridge with non-energy-balanced supplements: 8.8 g milk protein/d, 100 kcal/d (Milk8); 4.4 g milk and 4.4 g rice protein/d, 100 kcal/d (Milk/rice); 4.4 g milk protein/d, 48 kcal/d (Milk4); or a control (no protein, 10 kcal/d). IGF-1, length, body composition, and Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were measured at 3.5 or 8.5 mo. Linear regressions were used to assess the effect of milk interventions on IGF-1 and IGF-1 as a correlate of growth and cognition.Results: The increase in IGF-1 was 15.3 (95% CI: 3.3, 27.3) ng/mL higher in children receiving Milk8 compared with the control. The IGF-1 increases in the isonitrogenous, isoenergetic Milk/rice or the Milk4 groups were not different from the control (P ≥ 0.49). The increase in IGF-1 was associated with improvements in 4 out of 5 CANTAB domains. The strongest associations included reductions in "mean correct latency" from Pattern Recognition Memory and "pre-extradimensional (pre-ED) shift errors" from Intra/Extradimensional Set Shift (P ≤ 0.005). In addition, change in IGF-1 was positively associated with changes in height, weight, and fat-free mass (P ≤ 0.001).Conclusions: Intake of skimmed milk powder corresponding to one, but not half a glass of milk on school days stimulates IGF-1 in 6-9-y-old Ghanian children. IGF-1 seems to mediate the effect of milk intake on growth and cognition. The association between IGF-1 and cognition in relation to milk intake is novel and opens possibilities for dietary interventions to improve cognition.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Milk

KW - Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)

KW - Growth

KW - Cognition

KW - Children

KW - Low-income country

KW - Africa

U2 - 10.1093/jn/nxaa075

DO - 10.1093/jn/nxaa075

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32211798

VL - 150

SP - 1405

EP - 1412

JO - Journal of Nutrition

JF - Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 240787606